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5 Awesome Axolotl Facts

The axolotl also known as a Mexican salamander or a Mexican walking fish, is a neotenic salamander, closely related to the tiger salamander. Although the axolotl is colloquially known as a “walking fish”, it is not a fish, but an amphibian.

1. DON’T WORRY, WE’LL HELP YOU PRONOUNCE IT.

Phonetically, it’s “Ax-oh-lot-ul.” Atl means “water” and xolotl means “dog,” after the Xolotl, the canine Aztec deity.

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2. WILD AXOLOTLS ARE RARELY WHITE.

While you might see plenty of white ones in captivity, the animal is normally greenish brown or black. White ones are known as “leucistic” and descend from a mutant male that was shipped to Paris in 1863. They were then specially bred to be white with black eyes (different from albinos, which generally have red eyes).

3. THEIR FEATHERY HEADDRESS IS NOT JUST FOR SHOW.

The impossibly silly branches that grow from the axolotl’s head might not seem practical, but they’re actually the salamander’s gills. The filaments attached to the long gills increase surface area for gas exchange.

4. WILD ONES CAN ONLY BE FOUND IN ONE PLACE.

While you can find axolotls in aquariums and laboratories all over the world, it’s much harder to find them in the wild. The animals can only be found in the lakes and canals of Xochimilco, Mexico. The axolotl eats small fish, worms, and anything it can find that will fit in its mouth.

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5. THEY’RE CRITICALLY ENDANGERED.

As a result of habitat loss, pollution, and the introduction of invasive species like tilapia and carp, these salamanders are being pushed closer and closer to extinction.

In an attempt to revive the species, researchers have built “shelters” made from reeds and rocks to filter the water and create a more desirable living space. Unfortunately, the numbers continue to decline. There were about 6000 wild axolotls documented in a 1998 survey, but today, researchers are lucky to find any. For a brief amount of time in 2014, biologists failed to find a single water dog, and feared the salamanders had gone extinct in the wild. Luckily, some have since been found roaming the water. And although it’s not ideal, even if the elusive animal disappears from the wild entirely, the species continues to thrive in captivity.


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