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Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen dead at 65

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen dead at 65

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen died today at 65. Allen said earlier this month that he was being treated for non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Allen was a childhood friend of Bill Gates, and together, the two started Microsoft in 1975. He left the company in 1983 while being treated for Hodgkin’s lymphoma and remained a board member with the company through 2000. He was first treated for non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 2009, before seeing it go into remission.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella said Allen’s contributions to both Microsoft and the industry were “indispensable.” His full statement is quoted below:

“Paul Allen’s contributions to our company, our industry, and to our community are indispensable. As co-founder of Microsoft, in his own quiet and persistent way, he created magical products, experiences and institutions, and in doing so, he changed the world. I have learned so much from him — his inquisitiveness, curiosity, and push for high standards is something that will continue to inspire me and all of us as Microsoft. Our hearts are with Paul’s family and loved ones. Rest in peace.”

After leaving Microsoft, Allen became an investor through his company Vulcan, buying into a diverse set of companies and markets. Vulcan’s current portfolio ranges from the Museum of Pop Culture in Seattle, to a group focused on using machine learning for climate preservation, to Stratolaunch, which is creating a spaceplane. Allen has long been the owner of the Portland Trail Blazers and Seattle Seahawks as well.

Allen also launched a number of philanthropic efforts, which were later combined under the name Paul G. Allen Philanthropies. His “philanthropic contributions exceed $2 billion,” according to Allen’s own website, and he had committed to giving away the majority of his fortune.

Allen’s sister, Jody Allen, wrote a statement on his family’s behalf:

“My brother was a remarkable individual on every level. While most knew Paul Allen as a technologist and philanthropist, for us he was a much loved brother and uncle, and an exceptional friend.

Paul’s family and friends were blessed to experience his wit, warmth, his generosity and deep concern. For all the demands on his schedule, there was always time for family and friends. At this time of loss and grief for us – and so many others – we are profoundly grateful for the care and concern he demonstrated every day.”

According to Quincy Jones, Allen was also an excellent guitar player.

Developing…